Biking the Mahinapua Walkway – West Coast Wilderness Trail


oh it’s good to be back on the bike again and what a perfect day for it – sunshine, no wind, absolutely lovely.

forest of green Mahinapua walkway

We’re sampling some more of the West Coast Wilderness Trail – a cycle trail from Greymouth to Ross but easily broken into sections depending on your time available and fitness levels.

The Mahinapua walkway is part of the Hokitika to Ross section and we’re starting at the Woodstock end heading through to Hoki end and then back again – a nice easy in and out.

Did I mention it’s a stunning day – little chilly but it is autumn after-all and we have perfect riding conditions.

Mahinapua walkway West Coast Wilderness Trail

The Mahinapua walkway is actually an old tram line so very gentle incline to the middle in each direction really.  It starts through dense rain forest – part of the Mahinapua Scenic Reserve and scenic it most definitely is.

sawmill history Mahinapua walkway

It is a fabulous trail of stunning varying West Coast scenery topped with fascinating history from the sawmilling days.  There are plenty of relics on route and interpretation panels to give you a better feel for the days gone by.

forest block Mahinapua sidetrack

We take a little detour on a hidden side track and enter an old plantation forest – slowly being taken back over by the native forest.  It is a 4WD track,  climbing gently then meanders along the top before the gentle decline back to meet with the walkway.  It adds probably a couple of kms to the ride but only cuts out about 5oo metres of the walkway trail.

Mahinapua walkway West Coast Wilderness trail boardwalk

boardwalk Mahinapua walkway

Back on the trail and we reach the Mahinapua creek.  This section is a rather long boardwalk that crosses the creek as it meanders down the valley.  It is stunning through here and with little wind gives some great reflections.

bridge across Mahinapua creek

We finally reach the Hokitika end and the start/finish of the trail is a gorgeous old wooden bridge spanning the creek.  Again fantastic reflections and I love the vegetation around here – a great mix of marshland scrub and native shrubs and trees.

Picnic spot Mahinapua walkway

Time to turn back but not before a little detour through to “Picnic Spot”.  This is a short side trail on the track that takes you to the lake edge.  For some it is best to leave the bike and walk as it has some quite technical riding with lots of tree roots, rocks and little drop offs.

Stephen riding the trail Mahinapua walkway

It was a fun little detour – we enjoyed the challenge but were responsible when it came to the last section and walked down to the lake edge.

bikes in the forest Mahinapua walkway to picnic spot

I know – I think the bikes might have been happy for the rest here too……

oh it’s good to be back on the bike again.

The West Coast Wilderness Trail – another section done.  Something for everyone so make sure you include it on your list of things to do when you visit the West Coast of the Southern Alps.

Jan and Stephen run Breakers Boutique Accommodation on the Great Coast Road north of Greymouth.  They enjoy getting out and about and exploring the many wonders that help make this region so special.

 

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About coastingnz

Jan and Stephen live on the Punakaiki coastline, north of Greymouth on the West Coast, NZ and run Breakers Boutique Accommodation. They both enjoy the outdoors and are passionate about things to see and do on the West Coast and would like to share their experiences with you.
This entry was posted in cycling, Mountain biking New Zealand, Nature, NZ flora and fauna, NZ history, outdoors, photography, Travel and tagged , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

12 Responses to Biking the Mahinapua Walkway – West Coast Wilderness Trail

  1. Jane says:

    I am envious of these wilderness biking trails. The scenery is divine – so lush and green and also has diversity. Your photos always showcase New Zealand so beautifully. Stunning!

    • coastingnz says:

      Thanks Jane. We are spoilt with our landscape and I love that these trails have helped open up access to areas sometimes otherwise unseen – even by New Zealanders.

  2. bulldog says:

    If I lived there I’d own a bike for sure…. what beauty…

  3. Dayna says:

    I have to ask… are you a professional photographer? The light balance in all your photos, but particularly the rainforest ones, is superb.
    Yes, I’m jealous. (Yes, I should learn to use my camera much better than I have.)
    Lovely post. I would like to ride some of NZ’s rail trails sometime. 😊

    • coastingnz says:

      Yes hubby is a professional photographer – started out just as a hobby though but been at it since his Grandfather bought him his first camera at age 8 years – a wee while ago now……. He takes the photos and I write the words – a good team effort although I suspect it is the photos people follow us for rather than my words 🙂

  4. The green looks so green ! How lush ! I would prefer to hike than bike 😉

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